On Thursday, April 16, Dr. Kristina Killgrove and I presented our research at the 2015 Society for American Archaeology (SAA) annual meeting. Our research focused on scanning and printing unique faunal remains from the zooarchaeology collection here at UWF. Our poster was part of a symposium on 3D scanning and printing titled “Crowdsourcing, Co-Creation, and Collaboration Through Virtual Curation” organized and chaired by Dr. Bernard Means.

Dr. Kristina Killgrove and I presenting at SAA 2015!

Dr. Kristina Killgrove and I presenting at SAA 2015!

Over the course of the past semester we have been working on scanning bones from the zooarchaeology collection to create digital models and plastic replicas. After they were scanned and printed, the bones were subsequently painted in order to make them look more realistic to viewers. The resulting digital models and plastic replicas can be integrated into filed, laboratory, and educational settings to enhance understanding of artifacts and archaeological sites. The 3D models can be accessed in the field via smartphones and tablets to readily identify remains on sites were a trained zooarchaeologist is absent. The digital models can also be shared with other archaeologists or researchers who can access the digital comparative collections from anywhere in the world. The printed models can be shared with the public in outreach settings, museum exhibits, or educational demonstrations. Thus the field of 3D scanning provides many advantages to zooarchaeology.

Overall, the SAA conference was a valuable experience. I was able to meet and learn from other researchers in the fields of zooarchaeology, bioarchaeology, and 3D scanning which is very important to me as a graduate student. I returned from the conference feeling extremely inspired and I am already looking forward to SAA 2016 in Orlando!

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